1. "

    I’ve heard conservative voices, which claim the mantle of orthodox legitimacy poorly paraphrase or summarize the arguments about understanding homosexuality elaborated with much care and detail by Kugle, Greenberg, and others. There is no substitute for reading their works, reviewing their evidence, arguments, and intellectual creativity in full. Irrespective of one’s own personal views being open to learning and truly hearing another person in attempt to foster greater understanding and empathy is a worthwhile challenge.

    It seems that we should be able as a religious community to move the discussion forward beyond a simple rehashing of legal rulings regarding particular sexual acts. That discourse has dominated the conversation but is only a side point. I’m going to use broad brushstrokes here so bear with me for a moment. The LGBT community doesn’t need to seek permission from religious authorities for what they do in their bedrooms. It’s none of your business. What we, as a community, do need is a pragmatic religious and spiritual paradigm, which allows us to be fully present, seen, and included in our communities. And as Rabbi Greenberg says, “a way to envision a life of love, intimacy, and commitment…in the context of a religiously alive Orthodox (or otherwise) community.”

    For many religious gays, our orientation is not on the table for reconsideration or debate. Many of us have spent the majority of our lives working through the issues surrounding our sexual orientation so what is at stake is our faith and our lives.

    "
  2. A video of Imaan, the London LGBTQ Muslim group, marching at London Pride 

    Taken by Nick, a friend of Imaan members 

  3. Ramadan Mubarak Y’all! 
photo credit

    Ramadan Mubarak Y’all! 

    photo credit

  4. theedgarallanpoet:

Are you participating in our QUEER MUSLIMAH twitter convo?!

image description of tweets from Friday’s Queer Muslimah twitter convo: 
"There is an assumption in queer communities that if I don’t look queer, I couldn’t possibly be it"- via OutburstM
"Bored of orienting myself towards an audience that has questions. more interested in building #queermuslimah communities"- via Lamya H 
"@outburstM My relationship to Allah is not up for discussion just cus’ I’m queer and you’re fascinated!" via the edgar allen poet
"People have a lot of assumptions about being queer and/or Muslim, what is one thing you’d like to say to them?" via OutburstM

    theedgarallanpoet:

    Are you participating in our QUEER MUSLIMAH twitter convo?!

    image description of tweets from Friday’s Queer Muslimah twitter convo: 

    "There is an assumption in queer communities that if I don’t look queer, I couldn’t possibly be it"- via OutburstM

    "Bored of orienting myself towards an audience that has questions. more interested in building #queermuslimah communities"- via Lamya H 

    "@outburstM My relationship to Allah is not up for discussion just cus’ I’m queer and you’re fascinated!" via the edgar allen poet

    "People have a lot of assumptions about being queer and/or Muslim, what is one thing you’d like to say to them?" via OutburstM

  5. queermuslims:

Outburst, an organization working to build community between Muslim women and create safer spaces is hosting a series of twitter hash tag chats throughout the month of June. 
Today, June 5th: #SistersEntrance, 2PM EST
Tuesday, June 10th: #MuslimMenDo, 1PM EST
Friday June 13th: #Muslimahsinsports, 3PM EST 
Wednesday, June 18th: #MosqueDiversity
Tuesday June 24th: #DeafMuslimahs, 2PM EST
Friday June 27th: #QueerMuslimah, 1-3PM EST
Note: I’ll be reminding folks of when the #MosqueDiversity & #QueerMuslimahs chats happen

    queermuslims:

    Outburst, an organization working to build community between Muslim women and create safer spaces is hosting a series of twitter hash tag chats throughout the month of June. 

    Today, June 5th: #SistersEntrance, 2PM EST

    Tuesday, June 10th: #MuslimMenDo, 1PM EST

    Friday June 13th: #Muslimahsinsports, 3PM EST 

    Wednesday, June 18th: #MosqueDiversity

    Tuesday June 24th: #DeafMuslimahs, 2PM EST

    Friday June 27th: #QueerMuslimah, 1-3PM EST

    Note: I’ll be reminding folks of when the #MosqueDiversity & #QueerMuslimahs chats happen

  6. "

    The message of jumu’ah prayer that Friday at the Retreat gives spiritual importance to this family reunion of unique and diverse individuals. El-Farouk Khaki, one of the founders of el-Tawhid Juma Circle’s Toronto Unity Mosque gave the khutbah (sermon) and spoke more or less around the topic of the Retreat: “strength in diversity.” For me, one of the take-aways was what he said about the signs or ayat of Allah.

    The word “ayat” refers to both verses in the Qur’an and the signs or reflections of the Divine. My favorite verse related to this (ask me next week and I might give you a different one) is in Surat Fussilat:

    “We will show them Our signs in the universe and in their own selves…” (Qur’an 41:53)

    As far as the ayat of the Qur’an, we show a lot of respect and reverence. We make sure the Qur’an doesn’t touch the ground. We often make sure we are ritually pure when we pick it up to read. And we read it in a state of focus and attention (khushu’), cognitively and spiritually acknowledging it as holy.

    When do we afford the same kind of respect and reverence to other ayat of God? Are living breathing human beings of any less importance than a revealed book (to whom it was revealed for)? El-Farouk also asked us to look around ourselves, at the beautiful woodlands that surrounded us, asking us if we ever show the same reverence to nature and our planet.

    Reading the Qur’an for the first time, the idea of ayat was one of the things that drew me into Islam. That Friday–and the entire Retreat–became a reflection upon the ethical implications of such a theology.

    For queer Muslims, the presence of God in our lives has often been ignored and pushed aside. The normative rhetoric of preachers reduces us to desires, lusts, and mere feelings. Rather than approaching our gender identities and sexual orientations as legitimate challenges to normative religious thought, they interpret these identities away by defining them as a struggle. In the lived experience of queer Muslims, this jihad can become a lonely battle of covering up our identities, putting on straight and/or cis-gendered masks.

    In contrast, asserting that God is equally present in our lives, El-Farouk’s khutbah comes back to mind as I remember him reciting:

    “…and We are closer to [human beings] than their jugular vein.” (Qur’an 50:16)

    He incited everyone to notice that this divine nearness was not qualified. The verse does not read “and We are closer to straight men” or “closer to cis-gendered persons.” Allah is accessible to all. This makes the issue of pushing queer Muslims aside a pressing theological and ethical question. The same could be said of Muslim women whose presence is marginalized and limited in many Muslim communities, leadership positions, and Islamic spaces.

    Each of us are endowed with ayat of Allah. Each of us have reflections of God within each of us. Imagine if we treated one another with the same reverence and respect we impart on the Qur’an. What if we treated one another and the planet as holy? Could the Prophet Muhammad, pbuh, have meant this when he told us that the whole Earth is a masjid for us (a mosque; a place of prostration), that the physical place of a mosque is no more fit for prayer and no more holy than the green grass outside?

    What was so incredibly moving and overwhelming was how this ethic of ayat was put into practice. Normally, in any Islamic space (MSA meetings, events, the Islamic Center, etc) I assume discomfort and I often mentally prepare myself for unjust and un-compassionate reactions to my presence. I never realized how much this mindset had become such an expectation until I found myself in the Pennsylvania woods at a queer Muslim retreat.

    It was everything short of physically jarring to sit in a circle–literally and metaphorically–and have my identity validated and honored. We prayed together, side by side. Gender mattered not, nor did my sexuality. And in the same breath, my sexuality did matter because it was honored and respected as an ayah of Allah. We were all afforded the same access: we could lead prayer, call people to prayer, pray in the back, pray in the middle, pray to the left or right, or sit down and watch. I felt that our presence, no matter where or what kind it was, was honored as an integral part of the community we had formed.

    I remember clearly fajr prayer, the pre-dawn salat on that Saturday and being asked to give the call to prayer. I had not done it for so long I thought for sure I would forget or stumble over the words of the adhan. It turned out to be a very moving moment for me. And of all prayers to call for the fajr prayer. It brought back memories of going to the mosque everyday and feeling such a sense of belonging when I would be invited to give adhan, to lead prayer, or read hadith after prayer. Giving the adhan during the retreat only emphasized the sense of community I already felt.

    "

About me

A Tumblr by & for Queer Muslims - celebrating our dual identities.

This is not a space for debate or where we will feel compelled to justify our existence. This is a place for us to express ourselves without fear, to share resources, and to connect with other queer Muslims.

Asks should keep the above in mind. We reserve the right to ignore asks, no matter how "polite", that deviate from our mission of a positive space for us. Negativity, "nasiha", name-calling, takfiring, questioning of our level of Islamic knowledge, and demands for us to justify our existence will NOT be published here or responded to. If people have personal questions/comments for the moderators that step outside the positive & affirming mission of this blog, they should go to our personal Tumblrs (though we make no promises that we will entertain you there either!)