1. Funny how it’s harder to reveal your religion on tumblr than it is your sexuality.

    cop-doccubus:

    I am both a practicing Muslim and a lesbian. 

    And I’ll lose followers for saying this, but I decided that the only followers I want are those that will accept me completely for who I am.
    That’s all I’ve ever wanted.

    Being a part of both the Muslim community and the LGBTQ+ community leaves me feeling unwanted by both. And I feel like if I tell people I’m both Muslim and queer, it would make them hate me.
    Being hated is the full extent of my experiences with people growing up. I grew up in New York City at the worst possible time for a young Muslim, and was constantly bullied at school for both being Muslim and because the other kids suspected I was gay. And it contributes so much to my beliefs of how people will perceive me. I am so used to being hated, that it’s hard for me to understand how anyone could possibly love me. 
    I know I’m not the only queer Muslim. But it honestly feels that way. 

    As it stands, I do pray, I do wear a hijab, and I do dress and act as a Muslim. You couldn’t tell I’m any different from them if you saw me on the streets. Because I am them. People seem to assume that because of how I look or dress, I’m intolerant of queer people; but I am one myself. I’ve seen the glares I get from other queer people. I’ve seen them treat me as though I’m some homophobe, and make me feel unwelcome among them. 

    I fear rejection from both communities, so I come out to neither. 

  2. "[T]he closet is not proposed as the definitive liberatory space, a type of glamorous existential location for queer Muslims, or a panacea against the prejudice consistently faced by queer Muslims. Rather, the question is whether the closet, in this context can – and I contend that it can – be understood as a voluntary but vital expression of fragmented selves, of multiple identities and polymorphous sexual existences that refuse to be co-opted into the dominant discourses of power and authority. The closet can then, in fact, function as a prophetic voice on the periphery, a mode of existence that refuses to be allured by the trappings of “normative” practice. It is also perhaps the only empowering space for many queer Muslims where it is possible to preserve a balance between their religion, sexuality and society even if such a balance is tenuous and incommensurable at best."
    Beyond misfortune and fault : Islam, same-sex sexuality and liberation by Nadeem Mahomed 
  3. ‘Muslimah Q’ by Christina Clare (USA)

    A young Muslim woman recounts her experience converting to Islam and coming out of the closet.

  4. Question: what are some resources for LGBTQ converts to Islam that you would recommend?

    I’m thinking about creating a page on this tumblr for LGBTQ folks thinking about converting to Islam with links, book recommendations, facebook groups and other networking sites for support and making connections

    if you have any suggestions INBOX this tumblr (i really don’t have the time to scroll through reblogs and pick out what folks are trying to say)

    thanks so much in advance! 

About me

A Tumblr by & for Queer Muslims - celebrating our dual identities.

This is not a space for debate or where we will feel compelled to justify our existence. This is a place for us to express ourselves without fear, to share resources, and to connect with other queer Muslims.

Asks should keep the above in mind. We reserve the right to ignore asks, no matter how "polite", that deviate from our mission of a positive space for us. Negativity, "nasiha", name-calling, takfiring, questioning of our level of Islamic knowledge, and demands for us to justify our existence will NOT be published here or responded to. If people have personal questions/comments for the moderators that step outside the positive & affirming mission of this blog, they should go to our personal Tumblrs (though we make no promises that we will entertain you there either!)